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In this article we have explained Legal Procedures for Adopting a Child in India

Adopting a child is a noble decision that brings immense joy to families. In India, the process is governed by specific laws and regulations to ensure the welfare of the child. This article provides a detailed overview of the legal procedures involved in adopting a child in India, designed to guide prospective parents through the journey of adoption.

Legal Procedures for Adopting a Child in India: A Comprehensive Guide

The Central Adoption Resource Authority (CARA)

1. Regulation and Oversight:

  • Policy Formulation: CARA formulates adoption policies, guidelines, and regulations in accordance with the provisions of the Juvenile Justice Act and other relevant laws. These policies aim to streamline the adoption process, protect the rights of children, and ensure the suitability and accountability of adoption agencies and prospective adoptive parents.
  • Accreditation of Adoption Agencies: CARA is responsible for accrediting and monitoring adoption agencies across India. Adoption agencies must adhere to CARA’s standards and guidelines to ensure transparency, professionalism, and ethical conduct in all adoption-related activities.

2. Central Adoption Portal:

  • CARA operates a centralized online adoption portal that serves as a comprehensive platform for prospective adoptive parents, adoption agencies, and authorities involved in the adoption process.
  • The portal provides information about adoption procedures, eligibility criteria, documentation requirements, and updates on children legally available for adoption. Prospective adoptive parents can register, apply for adoption, and track the progress of their adoption applications through the portal.

3. Child Welfare and Placement:

  • CARA collaborates with state governments, adoption agencies, and child welfare institutions to ensure the welfare and protection of children in need of care and protection.
  • It facilitates the placement of children in legally approved adoptive families, prioritizing the best interests of the child and ensuring compatibility between children and prospective adoptive parents.

4. Intercountry Adoption:

  • CARA oversees intercountry adoptions in accordance with the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption.
  • It coordinates with foreign adoption authorities, embassies, and adoption agencies to facilitate ethical and transparent intercountry adoptions, ensuring that adopted children are placed in safe and nurturing families abroad.

5. Capacity Building and Training:

  • CARA conducts capacity-building workshops, training programs, and awareness campaigns for adoption professionals, social workers, and stakeholders involved in the adoption process.
  • These initiatives aim to enhance the knowledge, skills, and sensitivity of adoption professionals, promote best practices in adoption services, and raise awareness about the rights and needs of adopted children and their families.

Applicable Laws

In India, the adoption process is governed by a robust legal framework designed to ensure the welfare of children, protect the rights of adoptive parents, and regulate adoption agencies. Understanding the applicable laws is essential for prospective adoptive parents and adoption agencies to navigate the adoption process successfully. Here are the key laws concerning adoption in India:

1. The Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2015:

  • The Juvenile Justice Act, 2015, provides the overarching legal framework for the care, protection, and rehabilitation of children in need of care and protection, including those who are orphaned, abandoned, or surrendered.
  • It establishes the Central Adoption Resource Authority (CARA) as the statutory body responsible for regulating and monitoring the adoption process in India.
  • The Act outlines the procedures and guidelines for both in-country and intercountry adoptions, ensuring that the best interests of the child are paramount in all adoption proceedings.

2. The Adoption Regulations, 2017:

  • The Adoption Regulations, 2017, were formulated under the Juvenile Justice Act to provide detailed guidelines and procedures for adoption in India.
  • These regulations cover various aspects of adoption, including eligibility criteria for prospective adoptive parents, documentation requirements, adoption procedures, and post-adoption follow-up.
  • Adoption agencies and prospective adoptive parents must adhere to these regulations to ensure the legality, transparency, and ethical conduct of the adoption process.

3. The Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act, 1956:

  • The Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act, 1956, governs adoption practices among Hindus and provides legal recognition to adoption within the Hindu community.
  • It outlines the procedures for adopting a child, including the formalities required for giving and accepting a child in adoption, and the legal rights and obligations of adoptive parents and adopted children.
  • The Act also allows Hindus to adopt children under certain conditions, such as the consent of the biological parents or guardians.

4. The Guardians and Wards Act, 1890:

  • The Guardians and Wards Act, 1890, empowers the court to appoint guardians for the care and protection of minor children who are not under the care of their parents.
  • In cases where children are relinquished for adoption or placed under the care of guardians, the Guardians and Wards Act may be invoked to ensure their welfare and protection.
  • This Act also provides legal provisions for the appointment of guardianship in adoption cases, particularly for children whose biological parents are unable to care for them.

The Adoption Process in Brief

The adoption process in India involves several legal steps and procedures to ensure the welfare of the child and the prospective adoptive parents. Here’s a general overview of the adoption process in India:

  1. Eligibility Criteria: Prospective adoptive parents (PAPs) must meet certain eligibility criteria set by the Central Adoption Resource Authority (CARA) or the concerned State Adoption Resource Agency (SARA). These criteria typically include age, marital status, financial stability, health, and the ability to provide a suitable environment for the child.
  2. Registration: PAPs must register themselves with CARA or the SARA in their respective states. They need to submit required documents and undergo a pre-adoption orientation program.
  3. Home Study: A social worker conducts a home study to assess the suitability of the prospective adoptive parents and their living conditions for the adopted child. This involves interviews, home visits, and background checks.
  4. Referral: Once the home study is completed and the PAPs are found suitable, they are placed on a waiting list for a child. CARA or the SARA matches the child’s profile with the preferences of the prospective adoptive parents. The referral includes information about the child’s health, background, and legal status.
  5. Acceptance of Referral: PAPs have the option to accept or reject the referral within a specified period. If they accept, they proceed with the adoption process; if they reject, they may go back on the waiting list for another referral.
  6. Court Proceedings: After accepting the referral, PAPs file a petition for adoption in the court having jurisdiction over the child’s place of residence. The court reviews the adoption petition and may conduct hearings to ensure compliance with legal requirements and the child’s best interests.
  7. Adoption Order: If the court is satisfied that the adoption is in the child’s best interests and all legal requirements are met, it issues an adoption order granting legal custody of the child to the adoptive parents.
  8. Post-Adoption Follow-up: After the adoption is finalized, follow-up visits may be conducted by social workers to ensure the child’s well-being and adjustment in the adoptive family.
  9. Issuance of Adoption Certificate: Upon receiving the adoption order, PAPs can obtain an adoption certificate from CARA or the SARA, which legally recognizes the adoption.

Registration

The registration of adoption in India is a crucial step in the legal process of adopting a child. It ensures that the adoption is recognized by the government and establishes the legal relationship between the adoptive parents and the child. The registration process typically involves several steps and requires adherence to specific guidelines set forth by the Central Adoption Resource Authority (CARA) and the relevant State Adoption Resource Agency (SARA). Here’s an overview of the registration process:

  1. Preparation and Documentation: Prospective adoptive parents (PAPs) interested in adopting a child must first ensure that they meet the eligibility criteria set by CARA or the SARA in their respective states. This includes factors such as age, marital status, financial stability, health, and the ability to provide a suitable environment for the child. PAPs are usually required to gather necessary documents such as identity proofs, income certificates, marriage certificates, medical reports, and police verification reports.
  2. Orientation and Counseling: Before proceeding with the adoption registration, PAPs are typically required to attend pre-adoption orientation and counseling sessions. These sessions provide information about the adoption process, legal requirements, child care, and parenting skills. They also help prospective parents understand the challenges and responsibilities associated with adoption.
  3. Registration with Adoption Agencies: PAPs need to register themselves with recognized adoption agencies or with CARA directly, depending on the regulations of the state where they reside. The registration process involves submitting the required documents, completing application forms, and undergoing interviews and background checks conducted by social workers.
  4. Home Study: A critical part of the registration process is the home study conducted by social workers or adoption agency personnel. During the home study, the prospective adoptive parents’ living conditions, family dynamics, emotional readiness, and suitability for adoption are assessed. The purpose of the home study is to ensure that the adoptive family can provide a nurturing and stable environment for the child.
  5. Matching Process: Once registered, prospective adoptive parents are placed on a waiting list based on their preferences for the age, gender, and background of the child they wish to adopt. Adoption agencies or CARA match children available for adoption with the profiles of prospective parents. The matching process takes into account the best interests of the child and the preferences of the adoptive family.
  6. Legal Procedures: After a suitable match is found, prospective adoptive parents proceed with the legal formalities of adoption. This typically involves filing a petition for adoption in the appropriate court, obtaining consent from biological parents or legal guardians (if applicable), attending court hearings, and complying with the legal requirements specified under the Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2015, and the Adoption Regulations, 2017.
  7. Finalization of Adoption: Once the court is satisfied that all legal requirements have been met and the adoption is in the best interests of the child, it issues an adoption order granting legal custody of the child to the adoptive parents. This adoption order serves as conclusive evidence of the adoption and enables the issuance of an adoption certificate by CARA or the SARA.
  8. Issuance of Adoption Certificate: Upon receiving the adoption order, the adoptive parents can apply for an adoption certificate from CARA or the SARA. The adoption certificate officially recognizes the adoption and serves as proof of the child’s legal status within the family.
  9. Post-Adoption Follow-up: After the adoption is finalized, adoption agencies or social workers may conduct post-adoption follow-up visits to ensure the well-being and adjustment of the child in the adoptive family. These follow-up visits help provide support and assistance to the adoptive family as they transition into their new role.

Online Registration

In recent years, the Indian government has taken steps to streamline and digitize the process of adopting a child, including the introduction of online registration. Here’s a breakdown of the online registration process:

  1. Accessing the Adoption Portal: Prospective adoptive parents (PAPs) need to visit the official website of the Central Adoption Resource Authority (CARA), which is the apex body overseeing adoptions in India. CARA’s website provides comprehensive information about adoption procedures and guidelines.
  2. Creating an Account: PAPs are required to create an account on the CARA portal. This involves providing personal details such as name, contact information, and address. Each PAP is assigned a unique login ID and password for accessing the portal.
  3. Document Submission: Once the account is created, PAPs must upload necessary documents such as identity proof, address proof, income certificate, marriage certificate (if applicable), medical certificates, and any other documents specified by CARA. These documents are crucial for verifying the eligibility of the PAPs to adopt a child.
  4. Training and Pre-adoption Counseling: PAPs may need to undergo online training and pre-adoption counseling sessions, which are mandatory requirements set by CARA. These sessions aim to educate PAPs about various aspects of adoption, including legal procedures, child care, and emotional preparedness.
  5. Registration Fees: PAPs are usually required to pay a nominal registration fee for accessing the online portal and initiating the adoption process. The fee structure may vary depending on the adoption agency or state regulations.
  6. Preferences and Criteria: During the online registration process, PAPs are asked to specify their preferences regarding the age, gender, and health condition of the child they wish to adopt. They may also need to indicate their willingness to adopt a child from a particular region or background.
  7. Verification and Approval: Once the online registration is complete and all necessary documents are submitted, CARA or the respective State Adoption Resource Agency (SARA) verifies the information provided by the PAPs. This verification process involves background checks, home visits, and interviews to assess the suitability of the prospective adoptive family.
  8. Matching and Placement: After the verification process, PAPs are placed on the waiting list based on their preferences and the availability of children for adoption. When a suitable match is found, the adoption agency or CARA notifies the PAPs, and arrangements are made for the child’s placement with the adoptive family.
  9. Follow-up and Post-adoption Support: Even after the adoption is finalized, CARA and adoption agencies provide ongoing support and guidance to the adoptive family. This may include counseling services, medical assistance, and legal advice to ensure the well-being of the adopted child and the smooth transition into the new family environment.

Home Study Report

The Home Study Report (HSR) is a fundamental component of the adoption process, both in India and in many other countries worldwide. It is a comprehensive assessment conducted by authorized social workers or agencies to evaluate the suitability of prospective adoptive parents (PAPs) to provide a nurturing and stable environment for a child.

Purpose of the Home Study Report:

The primary objective of the Home Study Report is to assess the readiness, capabilities, and suitability of prospective adoptive parents to adopt and raise a child. It aims to ensure that the child will be placed in a safe, supportive, and loving family environment conducive to their physical, emotional, and psychological well-being.

Components of the Home Study Report:

  1. Interviews and Assessments: Social workers conduct in-depth interviews with prospective adoptive parents to understand their motivations, family background, parenting experiences (if any), lifestyle, values, and beliefs. These interviews help assess the PAPs’ understanding of adoption, their ability to provide for the child’s needs, and their readiness for the challenges of parenthood.
  2. Home Visits: Social workers visit the prospective adoptive parents’ home to evaluate the living conditions, cleanliness, safety measures, and suitability of the environment for raising a child. They assess factors such as space, hygiene, accessibility, and the presence of supportive family members.
  3. Documentation Review: The social worker reviews essential documents provided by the prospective adoptive parents, including identity proofs, financial statements, medical reports, character references, and any other documents required by the adoption agency or regulatory authority.
  4. Background Checks: Background checks are conducted to verify the prospective adoptive parents’ criminal record, employment history, financial stability, and overall suitability to adopt a child. These checks aim to ensure the safety and welfare of the child placed for adoption.
  5. Parenting Education and Counseling: Prospective adoptive parents may receive guidance, counseling, and training on various aspects of adoption, child development, attachment, discipline, cultural sensitivity, and parenting techniques. These sessions help prepare them for the challenges and responsibilities of adoptive parenthood.

Importance of the Home Study Report:

The Home Study Report serves multiple crucial purposes in the adoption process:

  • Child Welfare: It prioritizes the best interests of the child by ensuring that they are placed in a loving and supportive family environment capable of meeting their emotional, physical, and developmental needs.
  • Legal Compliance: The Home Study Report helps ensure compliance with adoption laws, regulations, and guidelines set forth by government authorities and adoption agencies. It helps prevent child trafficking, exploitation, and unethical adoption practices.
  • Support for Prospective Adoptive Parents: The Home Study process provides prospective adoptive parents with valuable insights, support, and resources to help them navigate the adoption journey successfully. It equips them with the knowledge and skills necessary to provide a nurturing and stable home for the adopted child.

Child Matching and Referral

In the adoption process, the stage of child matching and referral is a pivotal moment where prospective adoptive parents (PAPs) are connected with a child who is legally available for adoption. This phase involves careful consideration, legal protocols, and ethical guidelines to ensure the best interests of the child and the suitability of the adoptive family.

1. Legal Considerations:

  • Availability for Adoption: Children become legally available for adoption through various circumstances such as abandonment, orphanage placement, or relinquishment by birth parents. Before a child can be matched with prospective adoptive parents, their legal status must be confirmed, and all necessary legal procedures must be completed.
  • Consent and Legal Documentation: Depending on the child’s situation, legal consent may be required from birth parents, guardians, or relevant authorities before the child can be matched with prospective adoptive parents. Legal documentation, including relinquishment papers or court orders, must be in place to ensure the legality and validity of the adoption process.

2. Child Assessment and Profile:

  • Medical and Developmental Evaluation: Before a child is referred to prospective adoptive parents, comprehensive medical and developmental assessments are conducted to evaluate the child’s health, growth, and any special needs or requirements. This information is crucial for prospective adoptive parents to make informed decisions about their readiness and ability to meet the child’s needs.
  • Social and Cultural Background: The child’s social and cultural background, including their family history, ethnicity, religion, and any significant cultural factors, is considered during the matching process. This helps ensure compatibility and cultural sensitivity between the child and the prospective adoptive family.

3. Matching Criteria and Preferences:

  • Prospective Adoptive Parents’ Preferences: Prospective adoptive parents often specify their preferences regarding the age, gender, health condition, and other characteristics of the child they wish to adopt. Adoption agencies or authorities take these preferences into account when matching children with prospective adoptive families.
  • Child’s Best Interests: While considering the preferences of prospective adoptive parents, the primary consideration remains the best interests of the child. Factors such as the child’s age, developmental stage, sibling relationships, and any special needs are carefully weighed to ensure an appropriate match that meets the child’s individual needs and requirements.

4. Matching Process and Referral:

  • Adoption Agencies and Authorities: Adoption agencies or authorities responsible for child welfare and adoption services facilitate the matching process by reviewing the profiles of prospective adoptive parents and available children. They use professional judgment, expertise, and ethical guidelines to make suitable matches based on the needs and preferences of both the child and the adoptive family.
  • Communication and Information Sharing: Once a potential match is identified, adoption agencies or authorities communicate relevant information about the child to the prospective adoptive parents, including medical history, developmental assessments, and any other pertinent details. This enables prospective adoptive parents to make an informed decision about accepting the referral.

Legal Procedures

1. Pre-Adoption Legal Requirements:

  • Eligibility Assessment: Prospective adoptive parents (PAPs) must meet certain eligibility criteria defined by adoption laws and regulations. These criteria may include minimum age requirements, marital status, financial stability, and suitability assessments conducted by adoption agencies or authorities.
  • Background Checks: PAPs undergo thorough background checks, including criminal record checks, employment verification, and character references, to ensure their suitability and eligibility to adopt a child.
  • Pre-Adoption Counseling: PAPs often receive counseling and guidance on adoption laws, procedures, and the rights and responsibilities of adoptive parents. This helps them make informed decisions and prepare emotionally and practically for the adoption process.

2. Legal Documentation and Consent:

  • Consent of Birth Parents or Legal Guardians: In cases where the child is not relinquished or orphaned, consent from the birth parents or legal guardians is required for the adoption to proceed. Legal documentation of consent, relinquishment, or termination of parental rights is obtained according to the applicable laws and procedures.
  • Adoption Petition: PAPs file an adoption petition with the appropriate court or adoption authority, requesting legal approval for the adoption. The petition typically includes detailed information about the child, the adoptive parents, and the circumstances surrounding the adoption.
  • Court Hearings and Proceedings: The adoption petition is reviewed by the court, and hearings may be scheduled to evaluate the suitability of the adoptive parents, ensure compliance with legal requirements, and address any potential concerns or objections raised during the process.

3. Post-Adoption Legal Formalities:

  • Finalization of Adoption: Once the court is satisfied that all legal requirements have been met, and it is in the best interests of the child, an adoption decree or order is issued, finalizing the adoption. This legal document establishes the adoptive parents’ rights and responsibilities and grants them full parental authority over the adopted child.
  • Birth Certificate and Name Change: Following the finalization of adoption, a new birth certificate may be issued for the adopted child, reflecting the names of the adoptive parents. Any necessary legal procedures for changing the child’s name are also completed at this stage.
  • Post-Adoption Services and Support: Adoption agencies or authorities may provide post-adoption services, including legal assistance, counseling, and support to ensure the successful integration of the adopted child into their new family environment and address any challenges or concerns that may arise.

Court Hearing and Order

  • Court Hearings: Court hearings are scheduled to consider the adoption petition and any accompanying documentation. During these hearings, the judge may review the details of the adoption, ask questions, and address any concerns or issues raised by the parties involved, including the adoptive parents, birth parents (if applicable), and adoption agency representatives.
  • Legal Representation: Adoptive parents may be represented by legal counsel during the court hearings to advocate for their interests and ensure that their rights are protected throughout the adoption process

Issuance of Adoption Decree or Order:

    • Finalization of Adoption: Once the court is satisfied that all legal requirements have been met, and it is in the best interests of the child, an adoption decree or order is issued. This legal document formally establishes the adoptive parents’ parental rights and responsibilities over the adopted child and legally recognizes the adoption.
    • Legal Name Change: If the adopted child’s name is to be changed as part of the adoption, the court order may include provisions for the legal name change, updating official documents, and issuing a new birth certificate reflecting the adoptive parents’ names.

Key Considerations and Tips Regarding Adoption Procedure

  • Eligibility Criteria: Ensure you meet the eligibility criteria set by CARA before beginning the adoption process.
  • Patience is Key: The adoption process can be lengthy and requires patience and perseverance.
  • Legal Aid: Consider seeking legal assistance to navigate the court procedures smoothly.
  • Post-Adoption Support: Look for post-adoption resources and support groups to help integrate the child into your family.

Final Thoughts Regarding Adoption Procedure

Adopting a child in India is a legal process aimed at ensuring the best interests of the child. By understanding the procedures and laws, prospective parents can embark on this rewarding journey with confidence. Remember, adoption not only transforms the life of a child but also brings unparalleled joy and fulfillment to the adoptive family.

Conclusion

The adoption process in India, governed by CARA and supported by comprehensive laws, is designed to make the journey of adoption a smooth and transparent experience for both the child and the adoptive parents. By following the legal procedures and guidelines, families can look forward to embracing a new member with love and joy.

FAQs on Adopting a Child in India

  1. Who is eligible to adopt a child in India?
    • Indian citizens, NRI (Non-Resident Indian), and foreign citizens can adopt a child. The prospective adoptive parents must be physically, mentally, and financially stable, and at least 25 years old. Single individuals are also eligible, with certain conditions.
  2. What are the main laws governing adoption in India?
    • The Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act (HAMA) of 1956 and The Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act (JJ Act) of 2015 are the primary laws governing adoption.
  3. What is CARA?
    • The Central Adoption Resource Authority (CARA) is a statutory body of the Ministry of Women and Child Development, India, which regulates and monitors the adoption process.
  4. How do I start the adoption process?
    • Begin by registering online with CARA through the Child Adoption Resource Information and Guidance System (CARINGS).
  5. What documents are needed for adoption?
    • Commonly required documents include identity proof, income proof, residence proof, photographs, and a medical certificate proving fitness.
  6. What is a Home Study Report?
    • A Home Study Report (HSR) is an assessment conducted by a social worker to evaluate the living conditions, lifestyle, and suitability of the prospective adoptive parents.
  7. How long does the adoption process take?
    • The timeline varies but typically takes several months to a year, depending on various factors such as the completion of the home study report, child matching, and legal procedures.
  8. Can I adopt a child of any age?
    • Yes, children up to the age of 18 years are available for adoption, subject to the guidelines of CARA.
  9. Is it possible to adopt a child from a different state?
    • Yes, inter-state adoptions are allowed and facilitated by CARA.
  10. Can single parents adopt a child in India?
    • Yes, single individuals are eligible to adopt, with certain age and gender conditions.
  11. What is the role of the court in the adoption process?
    • The court reviews the adoption application and issues an adoption order, legalizing the child’s adoption.
  12. How do I get the adoption order?
    • After filing a petition in the court along with necessary documents and the home study report, the court will issue an adoption order upon satisfaction.
  13. What happens if the court rejects the adoption petition?
    • The court provides reasons for rejection, and applicants can address these issues and reapply or appeal the decision.
  14. Can NRIs adopt a child from India?
    • Yes, NRIs can adopt, but they must comply with the adoption laws of both India and their country of residence.
  15. What is child matching?
    • Child matching is the process where prospective adoptive parents are matched with a child based on the child’s needs and the preferences of the parents.
  16. Can I choose the child I want to adopt?
    • Parents can specify preferences, but the final match is based on the best interest of the child and CARA’s guidelines.
  17. What are the costs involved in adopting a child?
    • While there is no fee for adoption per se, there are legal and procedural costs, which vary.
  18. Do I need a lawyer for the adoption process?
    • It’s not mandatory, but legal assistance can help navigate the court process smoothly.
  19. How do I obtain a birth certificate for the adopted child?
    • Apply to the municipal authority with the adoption order and necessary details for the issuance of a new birth certificate.
  20. What is post-adoption follow-up?
    • Post-adoption follow-up involves visits or reports by a social worker to ensure the child’s well-being and adjustment into the new family.
  21. Can I adopt if I already have biological children?
    • Yes, having biological children does not disqualify you from adopting.
  22. What is the age difference required between the child and adoptive parents?
    • There should be at least a 25-year age difference between the child and the adoptive parent(s).
  23. Can I adopt more than one child?
    • Yes, but each adoption is treated separately, and the welfare of each child is considered.
  24. Is it possible to adopt a child of a specific gender?
    • Yes, prospective parents can indicate a gender preference.
  25. What are the rights of an adopted child?
    • An adopted child has the same rights as a biological child in matters of inheritance, support, and family name.
  26. Can the biological parents reclaim the child after adoption?
    • No, once the adoption order is issued, the biological parents cannot reclaim the child.
  27. What support is available after adoption?
    • Post-adoption support includes counseling, support groups, and sometimes financial aid for special needs.
  28. Can foreign citizens adopt a child directly from India?
    • Yes, but they must follow the CARA guidelines and also comply with the laws of their country.
  29. How are children prepared for adoption?
    • Children are provided with counseling and support to help them understand the adoption process and adjust to their new family.
  30. What happens if an adoption does not work out?
    • In rare cases, if the adoption is not in the best interest of the child, legal steps may be taken, including revocation of the adoption order, under strict legal scrutiny.

Sources:-

1. The Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2015

2. The Adoption Regulations, 2017

3. The Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act, 1956

4. The Guardians and Wards Act, 1890

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